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Taste the Harvest 2015pictures, photos

Taste the Harvest 2015 | pictures, photos Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.
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Thirtythree Cups salted caramel slice and Ironhouse Brewery beer.

Petuna Ocean Trout on show.

A coral perch on display with Petuna Fisheries.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

Entertaining children are (from left) Fairy Tales & Pirate Sails’ Queen of Hearts, the Mad Hatter and Alice of Wonderland.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

Launceston’s Charlotte Simpson, 4, dances to music played by band Midnight.

Receiving the Taste the Harvest scholarship is Claire Cunningham (second right), of Ulverstone, from (from left) Lions Club City of Devonport members Nancy and John Hughes and president Geoff Phillips.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

A festival-goer tries some chocolate mousse with caramel popcorn.

Sampling some wine are Winston Harris (left), of Brisbane, and Gary Best, of Devonport.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

Having a great time are (from left) Amanda Dixon and Kerrilyn Reynolds, both of Devonport, Matthew Richardson, of Melbourne, and Polly Smith, of Devonport.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

Sample the colour, fun and food from Taste the Harvest 2015.

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Australia dodge double whammy after Glenn Maxwell torches Sri Lanka in World Cup

Imperious: Maxwell plays a reverse shot against a helpless Sri Lankan attack. Photo: Rob GriffithAs it happened: Australia v Sri LankaYour team by team guide to the World Cup
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When Glenn Maxwell’s Big Show was in full swing it seemed a matter of how far for Australia but in the end the hosts were breathing a sigh of relief rather than celebrating an emphatic victory.

What should have been a regulation night in the office became unexpectedly tense thanks to Sri Lanka’s bold run chase, which had the near 40,000 fans on the edge of the seat for long periods.

The final margin was 64 runs but it may have been as narrow as the tear in Dinesh Chandimal’s hamstring, which thwarted the 2011 finalist just as they were mounting a final assault.

In reply to Australia’s massive total of 376 – the team’s highest at the SCG – the Sri Lankans were in the hunt deep into their run chase after Sangakkara’s 24th one-day international century.

Sparked by a whirlwind 62 from Tillakaratne Dilshan, which included six fours from a Mitchell Johnson over, and a hectic 52 from Dinesh Chandimal, the Sri Lankans made a game 312.

The victory has all but guaranteed Australia will avoid the double whammy of South Africa in the quarters and a trip to New Zealand for the semi-final.

Sangakkara hit a superb 104, becoming the first man to hit three consecutive World Cup tons and joined Sachin Tendulkar as the only men to have made more than 14,000 runs.

The turning point in Sri Lanka’s run chase came in the 42nd over when Chandimal was forced to retire hurt with a hamstring injury followed by the dismissal of captain Angelo Mathews for 35.

Mitchell Starc was the pick of Australia’s bowlers, collecting 2-29 from 8.2 overs in a game dominated by the bat, while James Faulkner and Mitchell Johnson collected vital wickets.

But the star for Australia was Maxwell, who in the lead-up to the squad announcement was not considered a certainty to be picked.

As well as Sangakkara batted, his ton failed to match the pyrotechnics of Maxwell’s blistering 51-ball century.

In yesteryear, a run-a-ball half-century would have been a good day’s work for any batsman starting his innings in the 33rd over. For Maxwell, it was enough time to hit the fastest one-day international ton by an Australian. It was also the second quickest World Cup ton and 10th fastest in the 44-year history of the ODI format.

An emotional Maxwell revealed he had been addressing a personal issue over the past fortnight during which Shane Watson had been a key off-field supporter.

He celebrated his maiden international ton by looking to the heavens and giving Watson the tightest of bear hugs, just metres away from where his friend Phillip Hughes was felled.

“Having Watto, he’s been there over the last couple of weeks, it’s been a tough couple of weeks,” Maxwell said.

“He’s been with me through thick and thin and I shared a special moment with him out there. Hopefully it opens the floodgates for me a bit and I can stop getting out in the 90s.”

The Australians were by no means in trouble when Maxwell entered the arena but a double strike which yielded the wickets of Steve Smith and Michael Clarke after crisp half-centuries threatened to halt their momentum. The opposite happened.

Maxwell, given lives on 73 and 93, dominated a 160-run partnership with Shane Watson for the fifth wicket.

Watson, batting in the unfamiliar position of No.6, played the perfect foil to Maxwell early before freeing his arms on his way to a bruising 67 off 41 balls.

The all-rounder conceded more than 10 runs an over with the ball though the wicket of Mathews offset some of that damage.

Clarke, who shared a 134-run partnership with Smith, appeared to be inconvenienced by an issue with his hamstring during his innings and had a chat with team physiotherapist Alex Kountouris at the end of the 27th over though no treatment was administered.

Clarke later said there was nothing wrong.

“I felt fine. Just the old age, apart from that all good,” Clarke said.

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Stupid approach to education

ANDREW Broad’s stated focus on education is a serious joke.
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As a retired secondary school principal with more than 18 years of experience in the role, I watched in despair as first Kennett, then Howard and now Abbott and Pyne decimated real opportunities for more than 67 per cent of Australian students.

The principal of Kings College, Sydney – the most elite of schools – said the balance was wrong and we needed to fix it.

Gonski was the promise that that would happen. Gonski is, in practice, gone.

To parents who live in rural Aust­ralia, here is a simple fact – 40 per cent of your children who could go to university don’t. This compares to 20 per cent who live in the big cities who don’t.

As further education is the strongest marker of lifetime success including health, this a 100 per cent disaster.

According to OECD data on learning in 2001, Australia ranked fifth and seventh in maths and science. Now we are 15th and 17th.

There is a rolling ball crashing through our civic society. Why, for example, would a young Australian turn down a $385,000 three-year science scholarship?

Dr Danielle Edwards turned down this prestigious scholarship. She said it was because of the Abbott Government’s attack on science. About 1500 science jobs have gone in the CSIRO alone.

Broad’s “knowledge society” is done and dusted unless he and his government change or we change the government.

Mr Broad thinks Pyne’s $100,000 uni degrees are good for us. No, they’re not. As so many of your constituents already cannot afford to go to uni Mr Broad, these changes will make it dramatically worse.

And Mr Pyne is tying education reform to the funding of 127science research centres across Australia.

The funds will go and immediately 1700 more science jobs go too.

Dumbing down our nation is not a goal, it is the most stupid thing I can imagine.

Robert Biggs,

Red Cliffs

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Penrith Panthers hold on for victory despite a late comeback from Canterbury Bulldogs

As it happened: Panthers v BulldogsFollow LeagueHQ on TwitterPlay Ultimate LeagueNRL 2015 Team by team guideQuiz masterclass: How many 70s footy stars can you name?Expert predictions on where each team will finish
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For almost 70 minutes the Penrith Panthers made last year’s grand finalists look second rate, but despite a mini lapse of concentration, they withheld a late Bulldogs onslaught to register a 24-18 win on Sunday afternoon.

The Panthers went some way to extracting revenge for their preliminary final heartache at the hands of Canterbury with a thrilling round one victory against the Bulldogs at Pepper Stadium led by an inspired performance from hooker James Segeyaro and a double to winger Dallin Watene-Zelezniak.

The Bulldogs, minus former skipper Michael Ennis, never looked in the contest until the 68th minute when they scored the first of three tries in 10 minutes to give themselves a chance at what seemed an unlikely comeback with three minutes remaining.

However, despite clawing their way back from a 24-0 deficit, the Bulldogs were unable to land the final blow in the dying minutes to take the match into extra time, leaving the foot of the mountains empty handed.

The Panthers defence held firm when it mattered most, withstanding two attacking sets from the Bulldogs in the final minute to hold on to the two competition points ahead of their round two match against the Gold Coast Titans in Bathurst on Saturday.

“We came into this game, and I always had a question mark over whether we could match up in a hot day for 80 minutes with a lot of players coming back from surgery in the off-season,” Panthers coach Ivan Cleary said.

“Fatigue’s an issue. The reality is in  today’s game, if you lose momentum … they had nothing to lose. Playing the Bulldogs when they have nothing to lose, there’s not too many teams more dangerous. They are a big side coming off the bench and everything seemed to be going their way at that time. My issue is allowing that momentum to change in the first place but we’ll move on and hopefully learn from the experience without having to lose.”

Not many clubs have the luxury of keeping all their players from the previous season, but Panthers coach Ivan Cleary has all 17 players he used in last year’s preliminary final at his disposal – and some.

The Panthers welcomed back Peter Wallace, Bryce Cartwright and Tyrone Peachey, who all missed last year’s finals series with season-ending injuries, also handing Raegan Campbell-Gillard and George Jennings their debuts.

Given Penrith’s opening round performance in front of a crowd of 18,814, the Sydney Roosters and South Sydney Rabbitohs appear to have some company in the premiership heavyweight category.

For the Bulldogs, the addition of Australian representative and former Dragons speedster Brett Morris at fullback, as well as ex-Cowboys winger Curtis Rona, didn’t have the impact coach Des Hasler would have hoped in their first outing of the year.

While Morris showed plenty of promise in the No.1 jersey, including a 70 metre try in the dying minutes, his forwards and halves failed to get the fullback into many quality positions for the majority of the match.

“I thought the first half we probably tended to shoot ourselves in the foot a lot,” Hasler said.

“Penrith didn’t have to do much to get down the field. At one stage the possession was round about 35 per cent and our attitude with the ball was poor. we weren’t responsible enough with the ball, which is probably a trend we have had a lot within the side. So it’s something that really hinders us and something we really need to adjust. I didn’t think we got many 50-50 calls.

“Some days you have those games, some days you don’t. The second half we played with possession. We traded set for set with them and were able to build some pressure and play with some field position and put on some points. So form that angle, from that position we were a little bit disappointed with our performance today.”

The Bulldogs also have a nervous wait ahead of their Friday night clash with arch rivals Parramatta with Josh Jackson on report for a crusher tackle on George Jennings, while Josh Reynolds, who was charged with tripping Ben Barba last season, could find himself in hot water after he stuck his foot out trying to tackle James Segeyaro in the first half.

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Shane Watson grabs opportunity with half-century in recall to Australia’s World Cup team but is expensive with ball against Sri Lanka

As one touring scribe noted when Australia’s team was announced on Sunday afternoon, rumours of the death of Shane Watson’s international career had been greatly exaggerated.
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Only four days after he was dumped from the World Cup team, he was back against Sri Lanka on Sunday and, with the pressure on, made the most of the unexpected lifeline.

Selectors rationalised his recall by saying they wanted his bowling experience in the conditions after a seamer was dropped to accommodate spinner Xavier Doherty, but it was with the bat that the blowtorch was always going to be on.

With Steve Smith having taken his No.3 spot with both hands, it was further down the order that Watson had to be satisfied with making his contribution and he did so with an important support role alongside century-maker Glenn Maxwell, making 67 from 41 balls as if sparked into action by his sacking.

Later, he was expensive with the ball, going at more than 10 an over as the Sri Lankans chased a mammoth target, although he did claim the key wicket of opposition captain Angelo Mathews.

Watson’s figures, like Doherty’s, were not pretty, interesting given the fact it was that element of his game that won him a reprieve. Even so his future as an Australian player looks far healthier than it did midway through last week thanks to his deeds with the bat.

The 33-year-old’s appearance at No.6 wasn’t just a much-needed injection of confidence but also an indicator of where he could feature beyond this World Cup in Australia’s Test series in the Caribbean and England if he can continue to make runs.

He has, of course, always preferred to be at the top of the order, but having been confronted by his own cricketing mortality since carrying the drinks at the WACA last Wednesday and with Smith stepping up at No.3, he will surely take a place wherever he can.

Watson’s naming in the team on Sunday instead of Mitchell Marsh had been a perplexing one. National selector Rod Marsh said of the decision to axe Watson before the game against Afghanistan that he would probably have to “rely on someone else’s lack of form or an injury to get back in” but despite Marsh not doing much wrong in a record World Cup win over the minnows, and having taken five wickets in the victory over England at the MCG, he is now back on the outer. Mark Waugh was the selector on duty in Sydney, picking the team with coach Darren Lehmann.

“You’ll have to ask the selectors,” was captain Michael Clarke’s pre-match explanation of the changes, headlined by Watson’s recall, and he refused to delve into selection matters too deeply after the match either,  jokingly gesturing like he was reeling in a fish when asked what he thought of the about-face on the allrounder.

“I”m not going there. The selectors pick the 11 players and my job is to try and get the best out of the 11 players There is no chance I am getting hold of that hook,” Clarke said with a smile, before adding: “I thought the selectors made it pretty clear and I tried to make it clear at the toss of the coin that (it was) horses for courses in regards to selection today. They went for the extra experience with Watto in the bowling department, only playing two frontline fast bowlers. That was a big part of why they made that call.”

On Watson’s performance, Clarke said: “I thought he played really well. His batting was how we know Watto can bat. He’s got amazing power and I think he played a big part in helping set the game up, that partnership with Maxy. Then he held his nerve under pressure I guess with the ball as well. That was a real test for us out there for us today. As games continue to move forward and you get into the knockout stages of this tournament we’re going to be under pressure and I thought the way all the bowlers held their nerve today was exceptional.”

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Pop-up skate park highlights demand: photos

Pop-up skate park highlights demand: photos Air time: Lennon Strachan tests out a pop-up skate park in Thirroul which was installed to show the demand for a permanent skating facility in the area. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER
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Air time: A pop-up skate park in Thirroul which was installed to show the demand for a permanent skating facility in the area. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Air time: A pop-up skate park in Thirroul which was installed to show the demand for a permanent skating facility in the area. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Air time: A pop-up skate park in Thirroul which was installed to show the demand for a permanent skating facility in the area. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Air time: A pop-up skate park in Thirroul which was installed to show the demand for a permanent skating facility in the area. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Air time: A pop-up skate park in Thirroul which was installed to show the demand for a permanent skating facility in the area. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Air time: A pop-up skate park in Thirroul which was installed to show the demand for a permanent skating facility in the area. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Air time: A pop-up skate park in Thirroul which was installed to show the demand for a permanent skating facility in the area. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Air time: A pop-up skate park in Thirroul which was installed to show the demand for a permanent skating facility in the area. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Air time: A pop-up skate park in Thirroul which was installed to show the demand for a permanent skating facility in the area. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Air time: A pop-up skate park in Thirroul which was installed to show the demand for a permanent skating facility in the area. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Air time: A pop-up skate park in Thirroul which was installed to show the demand for a permanent skating facility in the area. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Air time: A pop-up skate park in Thirroul which was installed to show the demand for a permanent skating facility in the area. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Air time: A pop-up skate park in Thirroul which was installed to show the demand for a permanent skating facility in the area. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

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Albion Park bats into semi spot

Scott Coombes scored a vital 21 for Albion Park in their win over Shellharbour which earned the Park a semi-final spot. Picture: SYLVIA LIBERAlbion Park have waited all season to crack the top four but only sealed a semi-final spot on the final day, with first innings victory over Shellharbour at Keith Grey Oval.
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The defending premiers faced bottom-placed Shellharbour in the final round with the winner to clinch fourth spot, but loser set to be relegated to First Grade next season.

Following a roller-coaster opening day, the Park resumed at 6-87, needing another 29 runs for first innings victory and the prize of fourth spot.

The Park’s lower-order stood firm, led by Scott Coombes (21) and passed Harbour’s 115 before being bowled out for 134.

Shellharbour were left needing an outright win and led by Ken Nguyen’s aggressive 59, declared at 5-164 to give themselves 36 overs to bowl out the Park.

With the home side 0-57, both teams shook hands leaving the Park to take on minor premiers Lake Illawarra in the semi-finals this weekend.

Shellharbour managed only one win all season and will be relegated to First Grade, if either The Rail or Gerringong win the First Grade grand final.

Albion Park began the final round fifth in the six team Premier League with Eagles president Terry Burns admitting it was “strange” to face a relegation or semi-final scenario in the final round.

“Winning only two games for the season we should be happy to make the semis,” Burns said.

“It’s a strange situation. But no one expected us to be premiers last season and we got there and we’re looking forward to playing Lake now in a semi-final.”

In the other final round matches, Lake Illawarra crushed Kookas at Oakleigh Park.

Needing an unlikely win to take fourth spot, Kookas were bowled out for 38 chasing 207 for victory.

The home side were 8-14 before Shaun Ryan’s unbeaten 16 at least ensured the home side didn’t have to check for an unwanted batting record.

Greg Connor (5-14) and Aaron Henry (4-19) delivered the Lakers victory in 17 overs.

Finally, Oak Flats beat Kiama outright with the clubs to meet again in the semi-finals at Geoff Shaw Oval this weekend.

Oak Flats took first innings points but were dismissed for 117 on day two, leaving Kiama needing 176 for victory.

The Cavaliers were dismissed for 132.

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Croker brilliance steers Raiders twenties to come-from-behind win

They’re the nephews of rugby league royalty, but Canberra halves Lachlan Croker and Lachlan Lewis showed why they’re rated future stars in their own right in Sunday’s come-from-behind under-20s win at Cronulla.
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With Canberra trailing 32-26 with three minutes left, halfback Croker put back-rower Jack Williams over with a superb short ball, and nailed the conversion from out wide to square things up 32-all.

He then kicked a penalty goal from 32 metres out after the full-time siren to steal victory for the Raiders.

Croker, related to Raiders games record holder Jason, set up the first try of the match in the second minute with a deft grubber kick to put winger Thomas Cronin over.

Ten minutes later it was Lewis, nephew of Wally, who grubbered and regathered before laying on a try for left-winger Cameron Booth with a cut-out pass.

After missing the finals for a rare occasion last year, Canberra looks set to challenge yet again after the club ended  its Queensland Cup partnership with Souths Logan.

Their NSW Cup affiliate Mounties is now loaded with fringer first-graders, forcing highly-rated youngsters Brenko Lee and Tevita Pangai to play twenties.

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ICC Cricket World Cup 2015: Glenn Maxwell’s big show continues weekend of flamboyance in Sydney

Your team by team guide to the World Cup
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Australia’s World Cup selections are getting a finger-in-the-dyke look about them. No sooner had they addressed their batting worries than their bowling sprang a leak. As Sri Lanka staged a spirited if ultimately vain assault on Australia’s 9/376 in Sydney, the hosts appeared to be a bowler, if not one or two fielders, on the light side.

As Kumar Sangakkara passed 14,000 one-day international runs and set off after 15,000, Sri Lanka gave the Australians a persistent anxious tremor. Could a team that battled to defend 376 win the World Cup? Perhaps this was to be expected from a team packed with all-rounders.

Shane Watson, picked for his bowling experience, batted vibrantly but was manhandled with the ball. On a turning track, the spinners went for 95 off 13 wicketless overs, even if one of them, Glenn Maxwell, had played the innings of his life. Only Mitchell Starc and James Faulkner were able to maintain consistent pressure. Australia achieved their aim of ensuring a likely place in the top half of Group A, but the ideal selection remains a riddle.

Michael Clarke, at least, filled the gap that had been opening most visibly under pressure. The debate over whether Clarke should have batted against Afghanistan in Perth was moot. A late slog is not why he is in the Australian team. He is in for when early wickets are down, the stakes are up, and sandbags are needed.

When he came to the wicket in the ninth over, at two for 41 with both openers gone on a slow, grippy pitch, there were no thoughts of massive totals.

The biggest mountains often don’t seem so high until the summit is reached. With the World Cup campaign potentially on the line, Clarke’s appearance alongside Steve Smith was reassuring. Smith was already in full flight, with a straight drive and two cover-drives off Angelo Matthews, the first and second raking the grass, the third on the up and beautifully controlled, squarer of the wicket.

Clarke, on the SCG, against spin bowling, is a banker. Steadily, he and Smith regained control. Clarke was comfortable whether skipping down the wicket or backing away for a Doug Walters-like cut shot. There will never be a hand-painted canvas Michael Clarke Stand, but there will never again be an SCG Hill.

While comfortable, Clarke’s batting didn’t look painless. Pink in the face from humidity, he was far from quicksilver between the wickets. After the 27th over, a medical-looking gent paid him a visit. Once the partnership had passed 100, Clarke began hitting more aggressively, if not quite more loosely. His first 50 balls yielded 38 runs and one boundary; off his next 17, he scored 30 more, with five hitting the fence.

Clarke the batsman has been rarely sighted this summer. Early on, his role was secondary to grief and statesmanship; later, it was overshadowed by hamstrings and headlines. His strike rate of controversies per balls faced was at an all-time high. But in cricket, to paraphrase Chairman Mao, power grows out of the middle of the bat, and here Clarke was back doing what he does best.

Lasith Malinga was brought on from the Paddington End in the 32nd over. He had not, so far, bowled a ball to Clarke. Malinga’s action is so strange, the ball looks like it might be coming from mid-off before it releases from somewhere near mid-on. It resembles a wall-eyed gaze: one looking at you, one looking for you. After an opening bouncer, which Clarke pulled away for two, Malinga tried three yorkers. Two were overpitched, and the third Clarke drove majestically back past the bowler. Malinga tried again and hit paydirt. Clarke was out for a run-a-ball 68, and in the next over Smith was gone for a true number three’s innings of 72.

The remaining 18 overs would be Maxwell’s big showcase. His long-awaited first international century was a very special innings, and when he passed the milestone he had more man-love for his partner Watson than had been seen in Moore Park for, ooh, at least 12 hours. This was flamboyance on parade, and Maxwell’s flourishing reverse sweep is cricket’s feather boa.

Australia was by then closing in on a one-day international score on the SCG that would have been a record until last week. But much of this had been a grim battle for survival, when Australia needed the mid-innings batsmanship they had lacked in Auckland. All big scores need groundwork – MS Dhoni says that even a 15-ball knock in a Twenty20 match needs to start with a patiently-laid foundation – and this platform was out of the textbook, built under high pressure by the firm of Smith and Clarke. By the end of the night, Australia would need it.

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Helensburgh secures inaugural minor premiership

Ben MarcianteHelensburgh clinched their first top-grade minor premiership and set up a semi-final rematch with Balgownie following Saturday’s 15-run final round victory over the Magpies at Helensburgh Oval.
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The top side all season, the Burgh were stretched hard by Bally in one of the most competitive one-dayers of the year.

Tight Bally bowling restricted the Burgh to 6-148, with Burgh skipper Ben Marciante (43) top-scorer and Jason Bunyan (2-15) and skipper James Fleming (2-44) bowling well for the visitors.

Balgownie (133 all out) couldn’t find enough partnerships and while Michael Stephenson (34) batted well, the Burgh bowlers did the job, led by Tim Lloyd’s 3-54.

“Being minor premiers is a terrific milestone for the club,” Marciante said.

“The club has come a long way in a few seasons and this is another step forward.

“We haven’t played a full day of our best cricket yet, so we know we can play better in the semis.”

Helensburgh now take on fourth-placed Bally at North Dalton Park this weekend, while second-placed Corrimal face University (third) in the other semi at Figtree Oval.

Corrimal, who were without their suspended skipper Rob Fisher, sealed a top-two spot with a seven wicket thrashing of Northern Districts at Hollymount Park.

Norths were bowled out in 35 overs for only 72, with Peter Kilby taking 4-15 and Xavier McDevitt 3-19.

McDevitt is Illawarra cricket’s leading wicket-taker with 47 scalps in 12 games.

Corrimal reached the target of 73 in just 18 overs with Joe McDevitt (30) top-scorer.

Fisher was suspended for two weeks for dissent following last week’s game against University, but is available if Corrimal qualify for the premiership decider.

Meanwhile, University marched into the semis in good form after a 180-run belting of Dapto at Uni Oval.

The Students posted 5-251, led by Taun Stanham’s 92 and 48 from Andrew Page and then dismissed Dapto for 71. Simon Irish took 6-26 for the Students.

Keira avoided the wooden spoon with home wins over Dapto and Wollongong in the final two rounds including a win by three wickets over the latter.

Troy Coleman took 5-28 for the Lions while Neel Honavar (34) top-scored in a fighting win. Wollongong skipper Dave Studholme (47) top-scored but his side finished last for the first time in many years.

Finally, Wests Illawarra ended the season with a 47-run victory over Port Kembla at Figtree Oval.

Batting first Wests posted 162, then rolled Port for 116.

Final ladder: Helensburgh 83, Corrimal 82, University 76, Balgownie 70, Port Kembla 49, Dapto 44, Northern Districts 43, Wests Illawarra 38, Keira 29, Wollongong 26.

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