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Job loss fears are very real

Not good enough: Glenn Kingston, Jay and Bailey Moore and Tim Coombes say their livelihoods are threatened by plans to privatise the state’s electricity network. They are among many members of the industry’s family who have vowed to protest against Leslie Williams ahead of the election.THEY say theirs is not a campaign based on fear, but is all about protecting the jobs of the mums and dads and sisters and brothers of the Hastings.
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Unions have argued against the privatisation of the electricity industry because of threats to jobs, including a freeze on apprentices.

Stop The Sell-Off’s Daniel Weizman said the apprentice intake has slowed significantly, in some places completely, since poles and wires were privatised in South Australia and Victoria.

“Ausgrid, Endeavour and Essential Energy haven’t taken on any apprentices this year, and that’s the lifeblood of this industry,” he said on Friday.

Mr Weizman is in the area to support electricity workers as they campaign against Port Macquarie MP Leslie Williams.

Members of the Electrical Trades Union and the United Services Union are easily spotted on some of the region’s busiest intersections wearing black and yellow.

The bumblebee army have “real concerns about their jobs”.

“Their fear right now is very real,” Mr Weizman said.

“They’re worried that if poles and wires go, the depots will be consolidated and overall numbers will fall.”

He pointed to the closures of control centres in Bathurst and Dubbo in recent years, “so the only ones left are here and in Queanbeyan”.

It was a misperception that selling or leasing the vital industry would reduce people’s power prices, he said.

Future prices will be determined by the Australia Energy Regulator, without the extra costs incurred from necessary system upgrades which have now been completed.

It’s also unlikely the benefits of the NSW government’s privatisation plan would be passed on to the Mid-North Coast.

“This community won’t see any of that money – most of what’s (made from privatisation) is targeted for projects in Sydney,” Mr Weizman said.

“This is a small community and once the lease goes through, that’ll be it.

“There’s no coming back.”

The unionist has extensive experience with privatisation through representing those employed by Harbour City Ferries, Sydney Water and the Roads and Maritime Services. He highlighted numerous safety issues with the latter, including insufficient staffing at critical times.

“This is about protection of workers now and in the future.

“It’s about protecting an asset that your dad, your grandfather helped pay for and now the government wants to sell it off.”

The campaigners have vowed to continue their high visibility presence through to the end of this month’s election.

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Community chest to benefit Highlands

Moss Vale president Jennifer Bowe recieves a cheque from Ashcroft’s IGA Moss Vale manager Brad Payten. CWA Moss Vale vice-president Colleen Urquhart, CWA members Doreen Peace and Lynette Croom with IGA staff members Shane Pritchard, Jane Bailey, Donna Moran and Nicole Maquire. Photo by Emma BiscoeTHE IGA Community Chest has opened and four Highlands community groups will reap the benefits.
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Each year, Ashcroft’s IGA in Moss Vale gives money back to the community, raised from the proceeds of IGA products sold.

This year, Moss Vale CWA, Moss Vale Men’s Shed, Meals of Wheels and the Wingecarribee Animal Shelter will share in the $5000 raised.

Ashcroft’s IGA Moss Vale store manager Brad Payten said in his six years as store manager, about $40,000 had been given back to the Highlands community.

“Over 11 years IGA has given $70 million back to local charities around Australia,” Mr Payten said.

“We’re a locally owned store and we enjoy giving back to the community.”

Last week Mr Payten handed a $1280 cheque to CWA president Jennifer Bowe and she said the IGA had been a brilliant support to the branch.

“We really appreciate the IGA’s generosity and support,” she said.

“They’re always willing to help us out and let us sell raffle tickets here.

“Like the IGA, we are for the community and what we make here we try to put back into the community.”

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Brendan Badenoch brilliance gets Macca across the line

IT was a bowlers wicket at Laurieton Oval for the Hastings River District Cricket Association first grade grand final.
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Winners: Macquarie Hotel defeated Wauchope RSL in the first grade cricket grand final. Pics: PETER GLEESON

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Brendan Badenoch lead the charge for Maquarie Hotel taking a monumental 14 wickets for the game.

He was almost unstoppable as he tore through RSL’s batting line up.

The only batsman that staved off Badenoch’s attack in the first innings was opener Nathan Lyon who was eventually claimed by the fast bowler for 58 runs.

RSL’s only other batsmen to reach double figures was Andrew Murrell who was also bowled by Badenoch for for just 13.

Badenoch finished the first innings with figures of 14.2 overs, three maidens, nine wickets for 41 runs and two no balls.

Despite the massive effort from Badenoch, Macquarie’s batters couldn’t follow it up and they suffered their own capitulation.

This time the damage was done by Wauchope’s Andrew Murell.

He didn’t quiet finish with the same impressive figures as Badenoch but he did enough damage to put Wauchope in front on the first day.

Murrell finished with six wickets for 22 runs and four maidens off 12 overs.

Only four Macquarie batters managed to make it to double figures giving them a first innings score of 73 well behind Wauchope’s 105.

Badenoch started his second innings the way he finished the first.

He took five for 43 runs which gave him a total of 14 for the match.

The game came down to the wire with Macquarie at the crease chasing down runs for victory.

Fittingly, it was skipper Michael Pelley who hit the winning runs with a four which also saw him reach his half century giving him 51 not out.

Josh Hyde chipped in earlier with 63.

Pelley was well supported to the end by Dan Kennedy 10 not out.

But the game was won off the back of what Pelley described as “one of the best bowling performances he’d ever seen”.

“After the first day when Wauchope were in front we spoke as a group about how gut wrentching it would be to lose after Brendan’s performance with the ball,” he said.

“It was one of the toughest finals I have ever played in.”

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Students challenge Bishop on big issues

Imparting wisdom: Australia’s longest-serving female politician speaks to MacKillop students for International Women’s Day. Pic: PETER GLEESONTHE Speaker of the House of Representatives visited Port Macquarie on Friday for International Women’s Day, and was given a grilling by MacKillop College students.
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The Member for Mackellar Bronwyn Bishop fielded questions on ambition, inequality and identity but perhaps the curliest one involved the F-word.

“No, I don’t consider myself a feminist,” the MP said.

“I consider myself an individual Australian.”

She would not be drawn on Opposition Leader Bill Shorten’s call for a national summit on domestic violence involving more voices of people who’ve experienced it first-hand, or those who help them.

“I think the Prime Minister having come out so strongly as he did, and supported by the Leader of the Opposition, to make it a non-political issue is the way it should be.”

“Therefore the government will take the lead and the policies will flow.”

On January 29, the Prime Minister announced an advisory panel on violence against women. Rosie Batty is the only person with lived experience of domestic violence on the panel – the Australian of the Year last week called for a crisis forum involving survivors, police, social workers, advocates and politicians.

“I would have thought Rosie Batty’s voice was the absolute best voice to have,” Mrs Bishop said when asked if the presence of one survivor on the advisory panel was insufficient.

The Speaker of the House then said more female voices would become involved with the panel.

“I can assure you there will be many more voices,” she said as she pointed toward her chest.

Domestic violence could be defeated, the senior politician said, “but only if men truly take ownership of the problem”.

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Australian dollar, asset prices under pressure as US strengthens

The Aussie looks set to open domestic trade below US77.20¢ on Monday. Photo: AFRThe Australian stock market could open more than 1 per cent lower and the dollar around six-year lows after a dramatic surge in the greenback and Treasury bonds because of stronger than expected job numbers in the US.
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The Aussie looks set to open domestic trade below US77.20¢ on Monday after plunging more than US1¢ to an intraday low of US77.11¢.

The local unit last dropped, briefly, below US77.20¢ a month ago.  However, it hasn’t held at these levels since May 2009.

Australian bond and stock prices will also remain under pressure this week as global markets adjust to fresh signs the US Federal Reserve may be forced to lift interest rates sooner rather than later.

According to the SPI futures contract for March 15, the main S&P ASX200 index will open 64 points, or 1.1 per cent, lower on Monday.

The trigger was a report from the US Labor Department early on Saturday Australian time showing that the economy added 295,000 jobs in February, compared with a Bloomberg survey forecast of 235,000.

The jobs surge drove the official US unemployment rate to 5.5 per cent, close to a seven-year low, and compared with 5.7 per cent last month. However, the improvement was offset with softness in average hourly earnings, which grew only 0.1 per cent, compared with market forecasts of 0.2 per cent.

Nonetheless, the data surprise sparked an immediate sell-off in US long bonds. The 30-year yield, which moves inversely to price, jumped 25 basis points to 2.84 per cent.

At the 10-year maturity, the yield rose from 2.11 per cent to 2.24 per cent as traders recalibrated their inflation expectations for the rapidly recovering US economy.

Futures market bets that the US Federal Reserve would begin monetary tightening by September climbed from 49 per cent to 60 per cent after the job market report.

This increasing divergence between the US economic fortunes and those of the rest of the world, including Australia, threatens to drive the greenback even higher against a range of currencies as yield-seeking investors pile into US dollar assets.

However, revised inflation expectations are bad news for equities. US stocks also sold off on Friday and the benchmark Dow Jones industrial average index ended the session down 1.54 per cent at 17856.78.

“The jump in 10-year yields and slide in equities confirms that the focus for investors across the financial markets is now on tightening in June instead of September,” BK Asset Management’s managing director for foreign exchange strategy, Kathy Lien, said.

However, she cautioned: “A hike in the [northern] summer is not a done deal because the central bank could still find reasons to be patient, particularly since low inflation remains a problem in the US and the rest of the world is dealing with deflation.”

Meanwhile, the Australian 10-year government bond climbed 12 basis points to 2.74 per cent, the highest implied yield since early January this year.

Mixed Chinese trade data on Sunday could also undermine confidence in Australian securities this week. The value of imports was down heavily year-on-year in February but exports were stronger than expected.

The statistics showed a heavy fall in commodity prices over the 12 months, although volumes eased only slightly.

“For instance, iron ore imports declined sharply – by 45.4 per cent year-on-year in value terms in January-February – but only registered a 0.9 per cent drop in volume term,” Australia and New Zealand Banking Group noted.

With Australian data flow this week dominated by February job figures and private sector consumer and business confidence surveys, market traders will be looking for further signs of domestic economic weakness.

ANZ’s forward-looking job advertisements series is the first indicator of the week, on Monday, followed by National Australia Bank’s business confidence survey on Tuesday.

Wednesday brings the latest Westpac consumer sentiment reading, monthly home loans data and an address by Reserve Bank of Australia assistant governor Christopher Kent in Hobart.

“Business confidence is expected to make little improvement in the February release due to the political uncertainty that characterised that month,” Bank of America Merrill Lynch economist Alex Joiner said in a note.

“The lower Australian dollar is a double-edged sword; being good for exporters but not for importers, most notably the retail sector, so its impact will be mixed.

“Oil prices should support sentiment in transport sectors, yet lower commodities prices more broadly will continue to keep sentiment subdued,” he said.

Thursday’s market-moving event is the February unemployment figures.

A Bloomberg survey of 28 economists indicates an unchanged unemployment rate at 6.4 per cent, after a 15,000 net gain in jobs. The participation rate is also expected to be unchanged at 64.8 per cent.

However, Bank of America Merrill Lynch is forecasting a slight improvement in the unemployment rate to 6.3 per cent, based on a drop in the participation rate.

“Outside of the volatile monthly reads, we expect the labour market to be soft for some time to come and the trend rise in the unemployment rate will not abate on a sustainable basis until late in the year,” the bank said.

Any negative surprises in the employment data will weigh heavily on RBA deliberations on monetary policy and increase the sense of divergence between the US and Australian economies.

This would provide further support for the greenback as bets mount of another cash rate cut by the Reserve Bank of Australia.

US data out this week include February retail sales on Thursday and the University of Michigan’s confidence measure for March.

Across the Tasman Sea, markets widely expect the Reserve Bank of New Zealand on Thursday to hold the cash rate at 3.5 per cent, with the neutral policy bias intact.

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Robertson/Burrawang secures double shot

Photo: FDCCRICKET
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ROBERTSON/BURRAWANG has secured a double shot in the first grade cricket finals.

The team recorded a thumping win over Hill Top on Saturday to finish in second position on the ladder.

As a result, the side will make the tough trip to Goulburn’s Seiffert Oval to face minor premier Goulburn in this weekend’s major semi-final.

The winner of that match will progress to the grand final, while the loser will have a second chance in the preliminary final.

Robertson/Burrawang secured that opportunity with a win on first innings points against Hill Top at Lackey Park.

The team had batted first on the previous Saturday in the two-day game.

The side compiled a big total of 354.

Hill Top resumed its innings with nine wickets still intact.

However, Hill Top struggled to gain momentum and was eventually bowled out for 138, despite the best efforts of Alex Debs (65).

Hill Top captain Simon Reid said his side lost a couple of wickets early and struggled to recover.

Reid said he was not pleased with the performance.

“It was a bit of a disappointment and it’s left us with plenty of work to do,” he said.

“We had been building a lot of momentum (in previous matches) and we were going really well.”

Hill Top finished the regular season in third place on the ladder.

The side will play the minor semi-final at Bradman Oval this Saturday and Sunday.

However, it remains unknown whether Hill Top will play Bowral or Wingello.

Fourth place will be decided on a count-back of the two teams’ for and against record.

The decision on which team progresses is expected to be known by Tuesday, March 10.

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$90m scammed from NSW residents each year

Mathew Mason-Cox.The state’s Fair Trading Minister has renewed calls for Hunter residents not to fall victim to scams.
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Mathew Mason-Cox visited Maitland last week to speak with residents about how to recognise scams and how to avoid being stung by them.

He said one in 20 people got scammed in NSW each year and about $90 million was handed to con artists, that the government could track.

“We’re out as part of our outreach program to alert people to scammers and what the latest tricks of the trade are,” Mr Mason-Cox said.

“These guys are very clever, unscrupulous and dogged in the way in which they target people.

“We’re going to a retirement village to make sure that message gets to our older community.

“They are often people that are targeted because they’ve got time, they’ve got a bit of money and, dare I say it, they are very trusting.”

The Mercury reported in January that two men had been knocking on doors of homes in Metford and East Maitland offering residents a free lap top computer from the government.

But in exchange, the residents were asked to hand over personal details such as tax file numbers, Centrelink identification numbers, birth certificates and bank account details.

Mr Mason-Cox said this was one of the most common scams that had been sweeping the state recently.

He said scam phone calls from people who claimed to be from computer company Microsoft were also common.

Mr Mason-Cox said the caller would tell the resident that a virus had been detected on their computer and that they could fix the problem if the resident agreed to pay a fee by credit card.

“They normally take a couple of grand a couple of days later,” he said.

Mr Mason-Cox said there have also been reports that Hunter residents had received bogus emails from people who claimed to be from the Office of State Revenue, which said the person had either been fined or was eligible to reclaim money from the department.

But when victims clicked on the link in the email, malware was put onto their computers which allowed the scammers to track that person’s key strokes.

“Then when you go banking, they get your password and user name and away you go,” Mr Mason-Cox said.

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Sarah Paul and David Wilton honoured for skills and courage at ceremony

COMMENDATION: David Wilton and Sarah Paul both received a Royal Life Saving Society NSW certificate of commendation at an awards ceremony in Sydney on Friday. Photo: MICHELLE PAUL
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WHEN Sarah Paul received a Royal Life Saving Society NSW Commendation award in Sydney on Friday, she was sure her father was watching down on her.

Ms Paul was presented with the award from NSW Governor David Hurley, “for showing outstanding skills and courage in what was a very traumatic and distressing situation,” attempting to save the life of her father, Kynan Paul, without hesitation.

Ms Paul, a nurse from Orange, was bestowed with the commendation alongside Mr Paul’s friend David Wilton.

The award came as a complete surprise to a modest Ms Paul, who never expected her actions would be recognised in such a public way.

“It’s just an honour to get a commendation,” she said.

“It means a lot to me for people to have thought of me in the work I did to try and save my dad.”

While Ms Paul said Friday’s ceremony was a bittersweet moment, she reiterated she was “very honoured” to have been nominated for the award and said it was also a way to honour her father’s life.

“It’s great to honour his life,” she said.

It was the morning of May 22, 2010, when tragedy began to unfold at the Paul family home at Clifton Grove.

Mr Paul, 45, was operating an earth compacting machine while he and Mr Wilton were working outside preparing a slab for a shed to be built.

The machine Mr Paul was operating fell into a four-metre hole beside the shed site where a water tank was to be installed.

As Mr Paul tried to get free, he fell forward and was crushed under the weight of the roller.

Mr Wilton ran inside to raise the alarm with Ms Paul, who was at home studying for her paramedic and nursing degree, which she was completing at Charles Sturt University.

Ms Paul rushed to her father’s aid, her knowledge and training taking over as she began CPR.

Mr Wilton rang emergency services, taking over CPR so Ms Paul could speak to the operator.

Even when the ambulance arrived, Ms Paul continued to assist in the treatment of her father, who died at the scene.

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Do Victory have what it takes to go all the way?

It’s not only tough at the top. It’s also highly congested. Five clubs separated by four points occupy the spots at the top of the A-League, with the rest some way behind.
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With seven rounds to go each of the quintet challenging for the Championship have their destiny in their own hands. Several will clash over the next two months in games that will genuinely meet their market billing as championship-defining six-pointers.

Although they lie fourth after the current round of games, Melbourne Victory, on 34 points, might theoretically be said to have a fractional advantage as they have a game in hand over the other four clubs chasing the Premiers Plate.

If they win that they would leapfrog current second-placed Wellington (36 points) and third-placed Sydney (35 points), drawing level with league leaders Perth (37 points) but going ahead because of a superior goal difference.

It’s a big if though, as at this time of the season most coaches prefer to have the points in hand rather than a potential advantage. As the clock winds down it’s always harder to chase than it is to defend as the psychological pressures from simply having to get a result can weigh down on players and managers.

Are Victory equipped for the task? Do they have the combination of attacking prowess, defensive nous and the strong mentality needed to come out on top in what is one of the tightest A-League title battles in a long time?

There is no doubt that Kevin Muscat’s squad certainly have goals in them.

They are the competition’s current top scorers, having netted 40 times in their 19 games, an average of over two a match.

Players like Besart Berisha (although he has not been as hot recently), Kosta Barbarouses, the explosive Tunisian Fahid Ben Khalfallah and the creative Brazilian Gui Finkler all represent a threat every time they get near the opposition goal. Veteran Archie Thompson is also a handy weapon to have on the bench when the heat has gone out of games.

Defensively Victory have drawn criticism but statistically Muscat’s side is one of the best, having conceded 25 goals. Only Wellington and Adelaide (23) of the teams in and around them have conceded fewer.

The coaching staff at Gosch’s Paddock believe their team have also shipped more goals than they should have on the back of some poor refereeing decisions.

They specifically point to the penalty awarded by Strebre Delovski in the 3-3 draw with Sydney when Seb Ryall, the Sky Blues defender, went to ground after a coming together with Gui Finkler, an incident that many believe did not warrant a spot kick.

They also, with good reason, argue that had referee Kris Griffiths-Jones got his decision right on Saturday night and disallowed Perth forward Andy Keogh’s opening goal for offside, then the result of that game would have been completely different. Replays showed that Keogh was narrowly, but definitely, offside when Michael Thwaite played a lofted pass through to him in the penalty area, which he converted from close range.

The return to fitness of French centre half Matthieu Delpierre could be the difference between going all the way and not for Victory. Several times in the past 72 hours Muscat has referred to the tall, elegant defender as a “clever footballer”, and his admiration for the former captain of German Bundesliga champions Stuttgart is evident.

Delpierre was, of course, rusty on Saturday night. But he still played with a calm assurance and the knowhow that comes from having played at higher level in competitive environments. His knowledge and guidance will be important for young defenders like Scott Galloway, Jason Geria and Nick Ansell over the next pressure-packed couple of months.

And his height means he always offers a threat in the air from set pieces.

Galloway was left out on Saturday by Muscat and Daniel Georgievski, the Macedonian international full back, given his chance.

Georgievski is a combative, committed figure and his presence in the combustible environment of a match against a physical outfit like Perth Glory might have been something of a gamble.

If it was, it paid off in style, as it was the left back who brought Victory level with a quality finish, a right-footed chip from the left past Danny Vukovic. Georgievski is a tough nut who never takes a backward step and that mentality will be essential in the drive to the line come season’s end.

Do Victory have the psychological toughness to go all the way? They haven’t won the Championship since the days that Muscat himself was providing leadership out on the pitch, with experienced men like Grant Brebner alongside him in midfield and hard-nosed professionals like Rody Vargas doing duty at the back.

In Mark Milligan they have a captain who is widely admired as a player and leader: he was, after all, handed the armband by Ange Postecoglou during the Asian Cup when he led the Socceroos in place of  the injured Mile Jedinak.

And Carl Valeri, a classic quiet man schooled in the art of defensive midfield play in Italy , definitely knows how to get the job done, a leader more by example than exhortation. He had a tremendous game in the engine room on Saturday night and having spent a decade or more in the demanding Italian game he will lack nothing for mental toughness.

Goalkeeper Nathan Coe can have his flaky moments – he almost gave away a goal with a miscued clearance against Perth – but he is also capable of pulling off fine reaction saves. He needs to concentrate fully from here to the end of the season if Victory are to go all the way.

Muscat’s side remain the author of their own destiny, for now. But they need to be on top form and retain concentration through every game if they are to land their third title.

The coach is right to describe his team – perhaps along with Wellington – as the most exciting attacking ensemble in the league, and they will continue to take the game to their opposition.

“It was an entertaining, attacking game of football. I was extremely happy we put them under a lot of pressure, we got on the front foot,” he said after the game on Saturday.

“There were so many positives to take. I thought the reaction [after going behind to a controversial goal] was outstanding. We felt it was offside. I might be wrong, but I doubt it. After that to play the type of football we did was superb.

“It was evident to me that there was one team trying to win a game tonight. to win any trophies you have to win games. I would rather not rely on not trying to lose a game.”

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GALLERY and VIDEO: ChillOut Parade 2015

GALLERY and VIDEO: ChillOut Parade 2015 ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH
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ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

ChillOut Street Parade.Picture: JULIE HOUGH

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